Milo Yiannopoulos lasted a single day on Patreon before getting banned

Former Breitbart editor Milo Yiannopoulos attempted to
fund a “magnificent 2019 comeback” on the crowdfunding platform
Patreon, only to be banned after one day. Yiannopoulos’ Patreon
campaign, whose banner image is seen above, garnered around 250
patrons pledging an unknown amount of money before being kicked
off the service.

“Milo Yiannopoulos was removed from Patreon as we don’t allow
association with or supporting hate groups on Patreon,” the
company said in a tweet. Leaked emails have
linked Yiannopoulos to white supremacists
, and a 2016 video
showed him singing karaoke in a bar while audience members,
including white nationalist Richard Spencer, gave Nazi salutes.

“I’ve had a miserable year or two, banned and de-platformed and
censored and blacklisted,” Yiannopoulos wrote in his Patreon profile. He asked
patrons to help fund a weekly late-night TV talk show, and to
help him “pay essential staff and service providers.”
The Guardian reported
earlier this week that
Yiannopoulos was $2 million in debt, a number Yiannopoulos
later claimed was actually “at least” $4 million in a flippant Instagram
post
.

In return, patrons would get
rewards
like “free Milo ringtones,” a signed poster of
Yiannopoulos, and an “elite-tier Milo coffee mug.” Backers who
pledged at least $500 per month got more personal perks like
“Milo will call you on your birthday,” and for $750 per month,
“Milo will fly to you and take you and a friend out for dinner
once a year.”

Yiannopoulos has been banned from several platforms, including
Twitter, where he encouraged harassment of comedian and
Ghostbusters star Leslie Jones. (He lost his
verification checkmark prior to his suspension, something

he complained about
in 2016 during a White House press
conference.) He was
also disowned
by parts of the conservative movement after
video clips showed him making statements
apparently supportive of pedophilia
.

Earlier this year, Yiannopoulos said on Facebook — where he is
not banned —
that he had
“been betrayed and abandoned by everyone who
ever called themselves [his] friend, with a small handful of
notable exceptions.” He also called his Facebook followers
“entitled fucking babies” for criticizing his spending habits.
“I’ll still be soliciting investment and donations from wealthy
private supporters,” he assured readers in his Patreon profile
— referring to supporters like the Mercer family,
which distanced itself
from him last year. “But I need you
to help me get back to work.”

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